Category Archives: Oz Events

Oz in the News 12.8.18

‘Wizard of Oz’ landscape sculpture coming to Centennial Park A whimsical “Wizard of Oz”-themed landscape plan for Centennial Park was approved by the Holland City Council Wednesday night. The late L. Frank Baum authored “The Wizard of Oz,” and 2019 will mark his centennial death anniversary. Baum spent many summers in Holland as he wrote the classic story that will now be represented where he once set foot. The landscape agreement between the city and the Holland Convention and Visitors Bureau will bring a three-dimensional flowerbed sculpture to Centennial Park. The sculpture will be shaped like an open book with “pages” referencing “The Wizard of Oz.” Character sculptures from the classic story will be installed on Herrick District Library property and linked to the flower sculpture with a yellow brick road. The flower bed book sculpture will probably be five to six-feet tall, Kenyon said. A company called Kadriform creates the structures constructed with a metal frame and filled with plants to form different intricate shapes and designs. Members of the Holland in Bloom Committee first got the idea for the project when they made contact with Kadriform at the annual Communities in Bloom Symposium in Canada. “This will be very professionally done, and will be very cool and neat to see,” Kenyon said.

Oz in the News 12.6.18

‘Wizard Of Oz,’ ‘Ben-Hur,’ ‘Shawshank,’ ‘Alien’ And ‘Field Of Dreams’ Headline TCM’s 2019 Classics The 14 movies returning the movie theaters as part of the 2019 TCM Big Screen Classics series have been revealed. The year-long event, in partnership with Fathom Events, gives film fans the chance to revisit, or enjoy for the first time, classic movies on the big screen. The first gem out of the gate in 2019 will be The Wizard of Oz. A critical success on its 1939 release, it actually didn’t make a profit for MGM until the 1949 re-release, earning only $3.02 million at the box office against a budget of $2.8 million – it was the most expensive production ever for the studio at the time. Thanks to various reissues, unadjusted for inflation, it has finally made $23.3 million. The Wizard of Oz will be in select theaters January 27, 29, and 30, 2019.

‘The Wizard of Oz’ secrets you probably haven’t heard “The Wizard of Oz” is still captivating viewers nearly 80 years since it first premiered in theaters. In fact, according to a recent research conducted worldwide, the classic musical has had the most impact in audiences than any other Hollywood masterpiece, including 1960’s “Psycho” and 1977’s “Star Wars.” Historians and collectors Jay Scarfone and William Stillman aren’t surprised by the findings. They’ve written several books on “The Wizard of Oz” and earlier this year they released “The Road to Oz,” which features interviews with several of those involved with the production of the 1939 film and surprising anecdotes from personal archives. The Oz experts spoke with Fox News about some of the surprising facts they found as they researched for their new book

Oz in the News 12.5.18

‘Wizard of Oz,’ Miyazaki to star in LA Motion Picture museum An immersive “Wizard of Oz” exhibit will greet visitors to the Motion Picture museum in Los Angeles when it opens after a long delay in late 2019, organizers said on Tuesday. A pair of the ruby slippers worn by Judy Garland in the classic 1939 musical, along with costumes, props and exhibits about the behind the scenes making of “The Wizard of Oz”, will be installed in the lobby of the Academy Museum of Motion Pictures. Hundreds of other movie memorabilia on show in the main “Where Dreams Are Made” exhibit will include a pair of doors from Rick’s Cafe from the movie “Casablanca” and the typewriter used to write Alfred Hitchcock’s “Psycho.” The 300,000-sq-foot museum, with two movie theaters and sweeping views of the Hollywood Hills, is now expected to open in about a year, museum officials said on Tuesday. The work of Japanese master animator Hayao Miyazaki will be the subject of the museum’s first temporary exhibit, followed by one on African-American cinema from 1900 to 1970 that is scheduled for the fall of 2020.

People demand refunds after utterly ‘sloppy’ performance of ‘The Wiz’ Dorothy forgot her lines, the Cowardly Lion looked more like a bear and the magical land of Oz was displayed on a laptop projector. A subpar performance of “The Wiz” put on by a concert promotion agency this past weekend at the Brown Theatre has caused dozens of Louisville customers to call and demand refunds, according to an employee at the Kentucky Center For the Performing Arts. Helen Barnett, who spent $65 for seats, said she was a fan of “The Wiz” because of its all-black cast. “It was terrible,” Barnett said. “Dorothy was wearing a Walmart dress. They forgot their dialogues … at one point Dorothy said she wanted to go back to Texas!” (In “The Wiz,” Dorothy is from Harlem while Dorothy in “The Wizard of Oz” is from Kansas.) Tasha McGhee, who went to the 7 p.m. show, said the actor playing the Cowardly Lion didn’t have a tail or a mane on his costume. He was missing one of his paws and was wearing one black sock instead. It went downhill from there. McGhee said there were several times the cast and crew set the wrong scene and needed to turn off the lights to reset it. “It was really sloppy,” Tasha McGhee said. “The backdrop was a projected image of a cornfield and a barn. But then laptop notifications kept popping up on screen. They were projecting it off of someone’s computer.”

Oz in the News 11.30.18

Before Bradley Cooper and Lady Gaga, there was Judy Garland. In a new book, her star is reborn “It was real emotional because it was at the Shrine and my mom’s first scene in her version was at the Shrine. Then Bradley Cooper got up and said (from the stage), “In 1954, Judy Garland sat in this seat to watch ‘A Star Is Born,’ and now, Lady Gaga.” I was so thrilled. Then the movie starts and she sings the first eight bars of “Over the Rainbow.” I was so taken aback and so grateful. Then I met her and she was so gracious. She’s incredibly smart, she’s funny, she’s grounded. I’m one of her biggest fans. And Bradley Cooper was generous and kind and a gentleman. I loved his version. They’ve taken one of the greatest love stories ever told and not only brought it to two or three generations who may not have seen the others, but they’ve kept the quality of the story. I’ve always said I think the reason “A Star Is Born” keeps getting told is because it’s not about Hollywood. It’s about human nature and love, and watching someone’s star rise and watching someone’s star fall. But, in the end it’s about someone who triumphs.”

This queer film festival reveals the asexuality allegory in The Wizard of Oz This year’s programming for Scottish Queer International Film Festival couldn’t be more diverse and involves a retelling of The Wizard of Oz. Kicking off on 5 December, the five-day festival highlights include LGBTI films from all over the world, challenging mainstream perspectives. The Wizard of Oz, particularly, questions the story seen as Dorothy’s lesbian awakening. The festival’s reimagining of the popular children book by L. Frank Baum and the even more popular 1939 movie adaptation starring Judy Garland, in fact, revolves around asexuality. ‘We have always wanted to do an event around asexuality at SQIFF,’ festival programmer Helen Wright told Gay Star News. They explained that they came across this asexuality theory while talking to a member of the asexual community. Wright researched further and found ‘an asexual reading of The Wizard of Oz online, posted on The Asexual Visibility & Education Network in the US by a user called Spoofmaster.’ ‘The reading riffs off a film academic called Alexander Doty’s interpretation of The Wizard of Oz as a lesbian story, with the Wicked Witch of the West being a butch lesbian and Glinda the good witch being the femme. Dorothy is caught between them discovering her lesbian sexuality during her adventure to Oz.’

Oz in the News 11.20.18

UW Professors Examine Long Marketing Life of the ‘Oz’ Myth As the three UW professors describe it, the book was born “on a balmy summer night in New York City in 2013.” They were passing the famed Gershwin Theatre late in the evening when a rush of theater patrons came out the front doors, excitedly discussing the stage production of “Wicked: The Untold Story of the Witches of Oz.” They noticed some were wearing tiaras, others dressed in green, and they even spotted a few sporting ruby red slippers. That got them thinking: How has Oz resonated so well through generations, and how many times can different versions of Baum’s original book be told through different platforms? The three professors’ book examines the long life of the Oz myth through the marketing machinery and the consumption patterns that have made its sustainability possible. Drawing on the fields of marketing, literary and cultural studies, and remediation theory, the authors examine key adaptations of Baum’s original publication. “For me, the biggest surprise was Baum himself. He wasn’t the impractical ‘dreamer of Oz’ we see in television movies,” Aronstein says. “Rather, he was an astute and savvy pioneer in the newly professionalized marketing field, and he used his experience to market and brand ‘Oz.’”

Oz in the News 11.15.18

There’s no place like home for ‘Ruby Slippers’ production “Ruby Slippers,” a creative collaboration through the University of Minnesota Theatre Arts and Dance Department, explores what happened the night Judy Garland’s ruby slippers were stolen from a museum in Grand Rapids, Minnesota. The production will run Nov. 19 and 20. “I was trying to find a new story to develop and I did a Google search of the three … oddest things … that have happened [in Minnesota], and up pops this article about these ruby slippers that were stolen from the Judy Garland museum in Grand Rapids, Minnesota in 2005,” said Luverne Seifert, the director of the show and a senior teaching specialist in the theatre arts and dance department. And so the idea for “Ruby Slippers” was born. The collaborators had six weeks to write the show and then six weeks to stage it. They drew heavily from the film “The Wizard of Oz,” as well as the TV series “Fargo” because of its focus on mystery and crime in Minnesota. They also tried to capture the grief of the community in Grand Rapids, like dialogue from an email written by a woman in Grand Rapids who was angry over the stolen slippers.

Oz in the News 11.9.18

‘Wizard of Oz’ draft scripts head for auction block A collection of draft scripts for “The Wizard of Oz” and other material from the archives of the 1939 film are going up for auction in December and could fetch up to $1.2 million. Los Angeles auctioneers Profiles in History said on Thursday four handwritten draft screenplays by Noel Langley were being sold. Langley, who died in 1980, was one of about a dozen screenwriters who worked on the big screen adaptation of L. Frank Baum’s children’s book that catapulted Judy Garland to fame and became an enduring movie classic. Langley’s first three original drafts, dated between April 5 and May 14, 1938, are being sold alongside a fourth draft of the screenplay, written by Florence Ryerson and Edgar Allan Woolf, and a fifth draft from August 1938 by Langley. “It is the single most important manuscript in Hollywood history,” Brian Chanes, head of consignment at Profiles in History, told Reuters. Chanes said the more than 150 pages of handwritten manuscript notes and pages were “the genesis of ‘The Wizard of Oz,’” tracing its development and changes from first draft to the final version. Some 16 photos of special effects, including the tornado sequence that transports Garland’s Dorothy from Kansas to the magical land of Oz, will be included in the single lot. The archive is being sold by an anonymous private collector who bought it years ago from the late Los Angeles memorabilia collector, Forrest J. Ackerman, Chanes said. Profiles in History put an estimated sale value of $800,000 – $1.2 million on the archival material, which will be auctioned during its Hollywood memorabilia sale in Los Angeles from Dec. 11-14.