Oz in the News 11.24.18

Matt Murray pens ‘Toto-ly Twistered’ Toronto musical Matt Murray remembers sitting in the audience at the Elgin Theatre as a Sarnia teenager to watch a production of Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat. All these years later, he’s a playwright in Toronto where The Wizard of Oz, a Toto-ly Twistered Family Musical, is being brought to life from Nov. 30 to Jan. 5 at the historic Theatre. “My 14 or 15-year-old self is pretty elated to be having the opportunity to write the show that is now on that stage,” Murray said. Technical rehearsals began this week for the second Ross Petty Productions holiday family musical Murray has worked on. This year’s version of Wizard of Oz is set in the present day. “I won’t give too much more away about it, but it’s definitely not your Judy Garland Wizard of Oz,” Murray said. This year’s version of Wizard of Oz is set in the present day. “I won’t give too much more away about it, but it’s definitely not your Judy Garland Wizard of Oz,” Murray said. Showtime and ticket information about Wizard of Oz at the Elgin Theatre can be found online at www.rosspetty.com.

Kermit the Frog on Why It’s Not That Easy Being Green in the Emerald City “The Scarecrow is a tough role if you’re allergic to hay. I sneezed between every take. But once I got a brain, I was able to figure out where to buy hay fever medicine. As for playing the Wizard, that’s an extremely difficult role for a frog. Y’see, Emerald City is green, so I keep blending in with the decor. But don’t worry, we fixed that. I promise to be completely visible when you come see our show.”

Vintage Sundays Review: The Wizard of Oz The Wizard of Oz more than lives up to its iconic reputation, and despite its famously troubled production, which saw no fewer than four different directors, it still manages to deliver a blissful, vivid trip into the magical world of Oz. However, the film is more than just an escapist sugar rush. While Dorothy may conclude that ‘There’s no place like home’ on her return to black and white Kansas, there is an undeniably bitter twinge as she leaves behind the glorious, absurd Oz for Kansas and the nice but dull Aunt Em. This film is often seen as an analogy for growing up, and while Dorothy, and the audience, must eventually face the grown-up world of Kansas, we are still given the rare chance to experience the world of Oz in uncynical, childlike awe. The Wizard of Oz certainly isn’t perfect, it is occasionally stilted, saccharine, and dated, but in spite of these flaws it is still absolutely worth watching, and returning to, just to be swept up in its wide-eyed, joyful sense of wonder.

 

 

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