Oz in the News 12.31.16

5659bbcb2d2e8a22Late Night in the Emerald City honoring Marcia Conwill With the glorious spectacle of Carnival, New Orleanians are often hard to impress, as our ability to throw a party is renowned. Now one more can be added to the list of the city’s legendary parties: Late Night in the Emerald City honoring Marcia Conwill. A creative statement was initially set with the invitation designed by Scriptura: a tornado of party information in gold foil set upon a Kansas farm scene, and a yellow house, floating separately in the emerald green envelope, which had a liner illustrating the Emerald City. The yellow house was the reply card, and on the other side was the information highlighted by a pair of red shoes. However, it wasn’t until party guests got to the Sugar Mill on the evening of Dec. 23 that they saw the vision: a modern re-telling of the Wizard in Oz in New Orleans. Upon arrival, guests began the evening in “Kansas” surrounded by cornstalks (and served champagne), but what truly astounded guests was the re-creation of the Conwill home. It wasn’t just the facade: when guests walked in, they realized the living room and library of the house had been recreated using the Conwills actual furnishings and art — original interior designer Sam Blount was flown in from New York make sure the rooms were exact, down to the last throw pillow. (Possibly giving a new meaning to Dorothy’s quote: “There’s no place like home.”) It wasn’t until moving towards the back door that guests saw a giant pair of red shoes positioned to look like the house had fallen on them.

Tarsem Singh is the wizard behind NBC’s ‘Emerald City,’ a modern take on ‘Wizard of Oz’ Tarsem saw the 1939 film just three years ago and says that he enjoyed the experience and described it “like a Hindi movie, incredibly kitschy and wonderful.” But his true inspiration came from the darker world of Baum’s source material and the “Emerald City” scripts (which originated with former show runner Josh Friedman). Tarsem confided to Cassidy that he’s often sent “crappy” scripts, because some believe he can make them look pretty. This wasn’t the case with “Emerald City.” Cassidy said the director loved the scripts and the characters, but wanted to take the visuals in a different direction. Tarsem’s lack of television experience did make for some awkward —  albeit humorous — exchanges. “Halfway through the thing he came to David and I on the set and said, ‘I just learned this new word, show runner, what is the show runner?’ David and I looked at each other and then I said, ‘I think that’s us.’

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